Maple-Nut Granola

If you’ve never made your own granola, you’ll be amazed at how easy it is to make. Just combine all the dry ingredients in a bowl, mix in the wet ingredients, and bake until golden brown. The best part is that homemade granola is endlessly customizable, just substitute your favorite nuts or dried fruit. My family enjoys the maple-nut flavor of this heart-healthy granola, but feel free to create your own custom blend.

My husband and I do a lot of outdoor activities and we always carry granola with us just in case hunger strikes. Packed with crunchy oats, toasted nuts, healthy seeds, coconut, and a medley of dried fruit that will keep you going throughout your day. This granola is perfect sprinkled over yogurt, eaten by the handful, or even with a splash of milk.

Maple-Nut Granola

Yield: 10 cups

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour and 40 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 5 cups old-fashioned rolled oats
  • 1 cup unsweetened coconut chips or flakes
  • 1/2 cup sliced almonds
  • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped pecans
  • 1/2 cup light brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • Dash salt
  • 1/3 cup unsalted pumpkin seeds
  • 1/3 cup unsalted sunflower seeds
  • 3 tablespoons flax seed
  • 1/2 cup pure maple syrup
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/4 cup canola oil
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup dried cranberries
  • 1/4 cup raisins
  • 1/4 cup golden raisins
  • 1/4 cup chopped dried apricots
  • Directions:

    Preheat oven to 275°F.
    In a large bowl combine oats, coconut, almonds, pecans, brown sugar, cinnamon, salt, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, and flax seed;set aside.
    In a medium bowl combine syrup, water, oil, and vanilla. Pour over the oat mixture; stir until well combined. Spread the mixture into a large rimmed baking sheet.
    Bake for 45 minutes. Remove from the oven, stir, and continue baking until golden brown and beginning to crisp, about 45 minutes more. Stir in cranberries, raisins and apricots. Let cool completely before storing. Store in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks.

    Source: adapted from Eating Well Magazine, November/December 2008

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